Chamberlain College of Nursing Virtuous Person Virtuous Citizen Report

Question Description

I’m working on a other discussion question and need a sample draft to help me understand better.

Introduction
Each person owes a duty to himself or herself and to the world to study ethics and to engage in thoughtful debate about what is right, and what is wrong. It is this habit of thinking about and reflecting on ethics that will help you determine the right choices when faced with an ethical dilemma.

Initial Post Instructions
Articulate a moral dilemma wherein one has to show a specific virtue or virtues (it can be any virtue or virtues including honesty, courage, charity/generosity, compassion, etc.)

  • What is the moral dilemma about?
  • What virtue or virtues should be shown? (You are here selecting the best course of action)
  • Why is that virtue or those virtues to be shown?
  • How should the virtue or virtues be expressed, and why in that manner?
  • Apply Aristotle’s golden mean to the dilemma.
  • Tell us how the dilemma involves conflict moral duties (loyalty to community versus to self, professional versus familial duties, national or personal obligations).

The dilemma must be a situation in which a choice has to be made.

Be sure you told us why your chosen course of action was best.

Follow-Up Post Instructions
Respond to at least one peer. Further the dialogue by providing more information and clarification.

Writing Requirements

  • Minimum of 2 posts (1 initial & 1 follow-up)
  • Minimum of 2 sources cited (assigned readings/online lessons and an outside scholarly source)
  • APA format for in-text citations and list of references

Student Sample: 

Hello class,

Articulate a moral dilemma wherein one has to show a specific virtue or virtues (it can be any virtue or virtues including honesty, courage, charity/generosity, compassion, etc.)

  • What is the moral dilemma about?
  • What virtue or virtues should be shown? (You are here selecting the best course of action)
  • Why is that virtue or those virtues to be shown?
  • How should the virtue or virtues be expressed, and why in that manner?
  • Apply Aristotle’s golden mean to the dilemma.
  • Tell us how the dilemma involves conflict moral duties (loyalty to community versus to self, professional versus familial duties, national or personal obligations).

I have chosen to discuss the moral dilemma that a nurse may face in the field is domestic violence. Whether this be a situation that involve partner domestic violence, child abuse or elder abuse, nurses may face this in their career. The ethical dilemma in this case is that the nurse needs to act with a sense of professionalism when faced with abusers. Nurses and other healthcare professionals cannot act out of anger at the abuser. The virtues that nurses must show in many of these situations is trustworthiness to the patient that is being abused, another virtue a nurse must have is compassion. This is a virtue that all nurses should have, you need feel  compassion for the patients you care for. The virtues should be expressed by making sure your patient knows they can tell you things in confidence and not be worried about it not being confidential and they must know you care.  Aristotle’s golden mean is the mean between two extremes where one end of it is excess and they other is deficiency (Kraut, 2018). This can be applied to this because you do not want to care too much to where you are crossing the boundary between patient and nurse on the other hand you also do not want the patient to think you do not care at all. Trustworthiness can be applied to the golden mean because you don’t want to the patient to think they can’t trust you so you don’t want to be on the deficient end of that. The dilemma involves moral duties to self because you may feel like you want to do more but if the patient doesn’t want that then you must abide by their wishes.

References:

Rachels, S., & Rachels, J. (2019). The elements of moral philosophy. New York, NY: McGrawHill Education.

Kraut, R. (2018, June 15). Aristotle’s Ethics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/aristotle-ethics/.